Durability-focused companies say their success lies in providing a true antidote to fast-fashion: ultra high-quality clothing, made sustainably, that people can afford.

How did we get here?

According to a recent survey commissioned by the British charity Barnardo’s, a majority of women’s garments are worn a mere seven times before being pushed to the back of the closet or tossed into the garbage.
There was a time, not too long ago, when well-made clothes were standard, available in catalogues, malls, and chain stores. In the last 25 years alot has changed in addition to products’ quality, is consumers’ expectations about price. The cost of clothing was in a period of deflation for almost 20 years before edging up more recently. That drop was largely the result of the globalization of the fashion industry and the movement of garment manufacturing from unionized shops in the United States and other developed countries to low-wage factories with few environmental regulations, most of them in Asia.
In the US, Americans buy a lot more clothing than they once did, on average 64 items and more than seven pairs of shoes per year—double what they bought annually in the 1990s.
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What can we do?

What this really means is that the culture of saving up and investing in fewer pieces and wearing them for longer has all but waned. Reversing consumer logic and buying habits is a tall order, especially without easy to access alternatives.

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